“Heart of Mine” by Bob Dylan – Some good advice regarding your heart health

Proverbs 4:23

English Standard Version (ESV)

Keep your heart with all vigilance,
for from it flow the springs of life.”

This song of advice to one’s own heart, contains quit a few cliches, but Dylan shows that sometimes cliches can be proverbs. If we are human, we probably will admit that we wish we had followed such advice, cliches, proverbs, or wisdom. Wisdom is learning to keep the “heart of mine” in the future.

Heart of Mine

Heart of mine be still
You can play with fire but you’ll get the bill
Don’t let her know
Don’t let her know that you love her
Don’t be a fool, don’t be blind
Heart of mine

Heart of mine go back home
You got no reason to wander, you got no reason to roam
Don’t let her see
Don’t let her see that you need her
Don’t put yourself over the line
Heart of mine

Heart of mine go back where you been
It’ll only be trouble for you if you let her in
Don’t let her hear
Don’t let her hear you want her
Don’t let her think you think she’s fine
Heart of mine

Heart of mine you know that she’ll never be true
She’ll only give to others the love that she’s gotten from you
Don’t let her know
Don’t let her know where you’re going
Don’t untie the ties that bind
Heart of mine

Heart of mine so malicious and so full of guile
Give you an inch and you’ll take a mile
Don’t let yourself fall
Don’t let yourself stumble
If you can’t do the time, don’t do the crime
Heart of mine

Copyright © 1981 by Special Rider Music
Alternate live version from the album “Biograph”
Heart of Mine was from the album “Shot of Love”
shot of love
BMC @ Manifest Propensity, 2014

“Godric” by Frederick Buechner – The advice Godric received from Tom Ball

godric3

“This life of ours is like a street that passes many doors,” Ball said, “nor think you all doors I mean are wood. Every day’s a door and every night. When a man throws wide his arms to you in friendship, it’s a door he opens same as when a woman opens hers in wantonness. The street forks out, and there’s two doors to choose between. The meadow that tempts you rest your bones and dream a while. The rackribbed child that begs for scraps the dogs have left. The sea that calls a man to travel far. They all are doors, some God’s and some the Fiend’s. So choose with care which one’s you take, my son, and one day – who can say – you’ll reach the holy door itself.”

Godric, p. 24

I find these medieval views of life to be quite refreshing in their “black and white” morality versus the “grey areas” relativism of our postmodern age, and in their sheer meaningfulness. Have we postmoderns relativized our lives into practical meaninglessness? And are we requiring our children to make bricks with their lives without giving them any straw to make them with?

220px-Figures_The_Israelites'_Cruel_Bondage_in_Egypt

A depiction of the Hebrews’ bondage in Egypt, during which they were forced to make bricks without straw.

Comments, questions, critiques, likes, are always welcome.

Thank you!

BMC @ Manifest Propensity, 2013

“The Maker of Noses” by Rich Mullins – The way to the place of peace.

The Maker of Noses

Rich Mullins and Beaker

I believe there is a place

Where people live in perfect peace
Where there is food on every plate
Where work is rewarded and rest is sweet
Where the color of your skin
Won’t get you in or keep you out
Where justice reigns and truth finally wins
Its hard fought war against fear and doubt Continue reading