‘God Save Arcade Fire’: an interview with Bryan Christman

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Hi, Bryan. To begin with, would you like to introduce yourself and your blog? By vocation I’m a lifelong landscaper, my parents having had a landscape and nursery business. I’ve been very happily m…

Source: ‘God Save Arcade Fire’: an interview with Bryan Christman

Fleetwood Mac’s “Lay it All Down” and the This-Worldliness of Redemption

In Fleetwood Mac’s 1971 album called “Future Games,” there was an interesting song about Moses and what his message basically amounted to in full. Perhaps a current Old Testament scholar may help us to understand the importance of the “message of Moses” in relation to understanding “redemption” as presented in the New Testament.

…we are prone to miss the amazing scope of God’s redemption, and especially its full bodied, this-worldly character, if we do not read the New Testament with the world view of the Old Testament as our basis and guide. (J. Richard Middleton, “A New Heaven and a New Earth“.)

So with that introduction in mind, presented in the video by Fleetwood Mac, is the “world view of the Old Testament” that can serve as our “basis and guide” to understanding “God’s full bodied, this worldly character.” I find it quite interesting that Fleetwood Mac, or at least one or more of the members of the group, seemed to have more insight into the “scope of redemption” than many Christian teachers and scholars had or have, even to this day.

Here are the lyrics:

Let me retell
A story of old
About a man named moses
Who lived long ago
He prophesied good
He prophesied bad
And now that prophecy’s
Coming to pass

Let all your sons, and your daughters
Of the golden calf
Lay down your burden of sorrow
Lay down your burden of hurt
Lay it all down, for paradise here on earth

(Instrumental)

A whole lot of people, including myself
Thought the story of moses was just a tall tale
But all of the things that we see going on
Are just what moses set down

Let all your sons, and your daughters
Of the golden – yeah
Lay down your burden of sorrow
Lay down your burden of hurt
Lay it all down, for paradise here on earth

(Instrumental)

Let me retell
A story I know
About a man named moses
Who lived long ago
He prophesied good
He prophesied bad
And now that prophecy’s
Coming to pass

Let all your sons, and your daughters
Of the golden – yeah
Lay down your burden of sorrow
Lay down your burden of hurt
Lay down your burden of sorrow
Lay down your burden of hurt
Lay it down

(Instrumental)

Lay down, Lay down ….

Lay down your burden of sorrow
Lay down your burden of hurt
Lay down your burden of sorrow
Lay down your burden of hurt
Lay down your burden of sorrow
Lay down your burden of hurt
Lay down your burden of sorrow
Lay down your burden of hurt
You’ve got to lay down your burden of sorrow
Lay down your burden of sorrow
Lay down your burden of hurt …

Lay it all down, for paradise here on earth

Any comments or questions are welcomed. Thanks for reading (and listening) – I hope you received something good from it all.

BMC @ Manifest Propensity, 2016

“Blows Against the Empire” by Jefferson Starship – What happened to “the Revolution”?

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This Jefferson Airplane/Starship album was released in 1970. The album was bold in it’s title but the countercultural revolution portrayed in the album was merely for the counterculturists to escape the empire on an actual starship in order to restart a new humankind elsewhere. Jefferson Starship was still claiming something revolutionary ( namely inner transformation and societal transformation via the influx of “eastern” religious thought) would happen when several years later on “Dragonfly” they sang Continue reading

“Vision” by Peter Hammill – “and they shall become one flesh”

I find this song line to be an interesting expression of the reality of “one flesh” found in the Bible, although I have no way of knowing if the writer consciously intended it as such an expression, nor whether he did actually intend the song to be about more than what Soren Kierkegaard called erotic or “poetic love,” namely the biblical forms of covenant love in marriage and/or the love between God and his people which was also described by the “one flesh” metaphor. I know that the song is at the least about “poetic love” and it is a beautiful song. (This is my third post about the song so you can see that I like it!)

“I don’t know where you end, and where it is that I begin…”

from “Vision” by Peter Hammill

Therefore a man shall leave his father and his mother and hold fast to his wife, and they shall become one flesh. Genesis 2:24 from the English Standard Version (ESV)

Comments, questions, etc. are always welcomed!

Thank you.

BMC @ Manifest Propensity

“Vision” by Peter Hammill – One of the best love songs you’ve probably never heard

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This is strictly a music post of one of the best love songs that most people have probably never heard. Peter Hammill was the co-founder and singer songwriter of Van Der Graff Generator in 1967. The song “Vision” is a wonderful love song from Peter Hammill’s first solo album in 1971 called Fool’s Mate. Continue reading

“Vision” – by Peter Hammill (On “poetic love” with Soren Kierkegaard & C. S. Lewis)

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A simply beautiful and amazing song (video & lyrics are posted below) by Peter Hammill, from an earlier time, way back in 1971. I do not wish to diminish the song (which should become more clear as I proceed) but if we were to analyze what is the factual basis in reality for such love what would that basis be? It would be found to be a moving example of what Soren Kierkegaard called “poetic love.” Continue reading