Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Poem “Christians and Heathens”

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People go to God when they’re in need,

plead for help, pray for blessings and bread,

for rescue from their sickness, guilt, and death.

So do they all. all of them, Christians and heathens.

 

People go to God when God’s in need,

find God poor, reviled, without shelter or bread,

see God devoured by sin, weakness, and death.

Christians stand by God in God’s own pain.

 

God goes to all people in their need,

fills body and soul with God’s own bread,

goes for Christians and heathens to Calvary’s death

and forgives them both.

 

From Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works, Volume 8, Letters and Papers From Prison, pp. 460-61.

This poem by Dietrich Bonhoeffer is perhaps one of the most accurate statements in Christian theology regarding the  question of where God is, in relation to human need and suffering. I may try to elaborate more on its meaning in future posts.

BMC @ Manifest Propensity, 2014.

Joan of Arc by G.K.Chesterton – The peasant warrior who surpasses Tolstoy and Nietzsche

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Arcade Fire says to Joan of Arc “…tell the boys their time is through” referring to the Medieval Church as the boys. She may be to Arcade Fire a sort of feminist icon, because of what she did.

G.K. Chesterton, in “Orthodoxy,” the autobiograhy of his amazing journey from atheism to the Christian faith, essentially says the same thing to Joan of Arc. Chesterton also seems to say for her to “tell the boys” named Tolstoy and Nietzsche that she was not stuck at the cross-roads as they were, but surpassed their frozen intellectualism with her action. Continue reading