“Heart of Mine” by Bob Dylan – Some good advice regarding your heart health

Proverbs 4:23

English Standard Version (ESV)

Keep your heart with all vigilance,
for from it flow the springs of life.”

This song of advice to one’s own heart, contains quit a few cliches, but Dylan shows that sometimes cliches can be proverbs. If we are human, we probably will admit that we wish we had followed such advice, cliches, proverbs, or wisdom. Wisdom is learning to keep the “heart of mine” in the future.

Heart of Mine

Heart of mine be still
You can play with fire but you’ll get the bill
Don’t let her know
Don’t let her know that you love her
Don’t be a fool, don’t be blind
Heart of mine

Heart of mine go back home
You got no reason to wander, you got no reason to roam
Don’t let her see
Don’t let her see that you need her
Don’t put yourself over the line
Heart of mine

Heart of mine go back where you been
It’ll only be trouble for you if you let her in
Don’t let her hear
Don’t let her hear you want her
Don’t let her think you think she’s fine
Heart of mine

Heart of mine you know that she’ll never be true
She’ll only give to others the love that she’s gotten from you
Don’t let her know
Don’t let her know where you’re going
Don’t untie the ties that bind
Heart of mine

Heart of mine so malicious and so full of guile
Give you an inch and you’ll take a mile
Don’t let yourself fall
Don’t let yourself stumble
If you can’t do the time, don’t do the crime
Heart of mine

Copyright © 1981 by Special Rider Music
Alternate live version from the album “Biograph”
Heart of Mine was from the album “Shot of Love”
shot of love
BMC @ Manifest Propensity, 2014

“Blue December” – A Poem

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Yesterday I noted that a local church was holding a “Blue December Service.” I also know people that struggle with December annually. So I wrote this little poem with those in mind for whom the holiday season tends more toward being a “Blue December” than a “White Christmas.” Continue reading

Soren Kierkegaard on “Keeping the two commandments” – “Works of Love” 8 (preferential love, part 1)

works of love

“Just because Christianity is the true ethic, it knows how to shorten deliberations and cut short prolix instructions, to remove all provisional waiting and preclude all waste of time. Christianity is involved in the task immediately, because it has brought the task along. There is, indeed, great debate going on in the world about what should be called the highest good. But whatever it is called at the moment, whatever variations there are, it is unbelievable how many prolexities are involved in grasping it.”

“Christianity, however, teaches a man immediately the shortest way to find the highest good: shut your door and pray to God – for God is still the highest.  And when a man will go out into the world, he can go a long way – and go in vain –  he can wander the world around – and in vain – all in order to find the beloved or the friend. But Christianity never suffers a man to go in vain, not even a single step, for when you open the door which you shut in order to pray to God, the first person you meet as you go out is your neighbor whom you shall love. Wonderful!” (Soren Kierkegaard, “Works of Love” p. 64.) Continue reading

“If life’s for livin’ what’s livin’ for…” – A simple question from the Kinks

muswell hillbillies

“If life’s for livin’ what’s livin’ for…”

A simple question, or is it?

Do they know the answer in Oklahoma, USA?

“All life we work but work is a bore,

   if life’s for livin’ what’s livin’ for?”

A beautiful song by the Kinks, that begs for an answer!

Comments, questions?

BMC @ Manifest Propensity, 2013

Tried and Tested by Bruce Cockburn – The cost of open eyes

You've never seen

(+Notice that there are more than two hands in this picture+)

“Opening” our eyes is not something we do on our own.

Tried and Tested is the “opening” (and an excellent) song from Bruce Cockburn’s 2003 album “You’ve Never Seen Everything.”

Lyrics: 

Tried and tested
Tried and tested

By the cries of birds
By the lies I’ve heard
By my own loose talk
By the way I walk Continue reading

“Roll Away Your Stone” by Mumford & Sons – An Interpretation: Narrative of a conversion

Knowing the potential perils of song interpretation, I nevertheless could not resist this song by Mumford & Sons that seems to be quite unique in popular culture in regard to its subject. I may be taking the song too literally, but I find this song to be a narrative of a spiritual conversion. Continue reading